Caché; The Film That Hides the Truth!


Caché (Hidden) is Michael Haneke’s 2005 fascinating, award-winning film in which the director builds up electrifying tension through heightened contrast coupled with the fear of the unknown.
The serene Parisian family life of Georges (Daniel Auteuil), his wife Anne (Juliette Binoche), and their twelve year-old son Pierrot is contrasted by the turmoil stemming from the arrival of a haunting videocassette recording of the family’s comings and goings. The cassette mysteriously showed up on the family’s doorstep. More arrive at different times. At first, the recordings appear to be a harmless prank, but when the cassettes are accompanied by strange drawings of mutilated animals and stick figures with blood pouring from them, the family begins to worry.
As the film continues we learn that along with this horror the family is, in many ways, dysfunctional. The husband does not communicate with his wife, nor share his feelings with her. Ann has her own secrets. There are hints throughout the movie that she may be carrying on an affair with a friend. Pierrot, always on the edge of the action, gives the impression of being rebellious and spiteful. Each member of this family holds secrets that accelerate the conflict and fan the flames of self sabotage.
What are the secrets you keep hidden? What do you hide from your family and friends, your lover or your spouse? Are the truths you hide more dangerous than those you reveal? Is it better to keep them secret? Do you try to hide them from yourself?
It’s time to spill the beans . . .

Popular posts from this blog

MY SIX-STEP FORMULA FOR WRITING THE SHORT SHORT THAT EVERYONE WILL WANT TO READ

3 REASONS TO USE SLANT RHYME IN YOUR POETRY

THINK (-OUTSIDE) WITHOUT THAT FREAKIN’ BOX