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Showing posts from April, 2012

LIN ANDERSON: THE STRUCTURE OF STORY, PART II

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Today, I'm excited to re-introduce Lin Anderson for Part 2 of her 3-part series on The Structure of Story. Lin has a lot of writing experience, having published eight novels, which feature forensic expert Dr Rhona MacLeod. Her books have been translated into several langauages and are in development for TV. Her short stories have appeared in a number of collections, most recently Dead Close was chosen for the Best of British Crime 2011. Also a screenwriter, her film River Child won a BAFTA and the Celtic Film Festival best fiction award. Lin's website is: http://www.lin-anderson.com/


Part 2: The Muddle in the Middle
As I said in my opening piece, human beings intuitively understand when a story works. That’s probably most obvious when sitting in a packed cinema. The collective intelligence of the audience knows when things are going slack in the story. This happens usually in the middle section when the audience starts to fidget and eat their popcorn. They’ve dropped out of the …

EDITING - UGH!

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Yesterday, I deleted nearly 600 words from a story that I have been working on for the last two weeks. Did it hurt? You bet it did. But by doing so, it improved the story dramatically.
Don't you wish you could write prose that flowed across the paper like soft butter on warm toast? Dream on. If you’re like me, you're spending more time editing your stories than almost anything else. Editing is an integral part of the writing process, and it is only through thoughtful editing that my stories have come alive. Writing a story is like building a house with a lump of clay. You begin by roughing out the shape you want. Editing is the modeling process that shapes the clay into the beautiful finished product you had in mind when you began.
The more experience I gain as a writer, the more I edit. The more I edit, the more experience I gain as a writer.
George Lucas, talking about film editing, gives us an excellent definition on the subject. His words apply to story editing, as well. …

Lin Anderson: Things I Wish Someone Had Told Me…

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Today, I'm proud to introduce guest blogger, Lin Anderson who has published eight novels featuring forensic expert Dr Rhona MacLeod. Lin's books have been translated into several langauages and are in development for TV. Her short stories have appeared in a number of collections, most recently Dead Close was chosen for the Best of British Crime 2011. Also a screenwriter, her film River Child won a BAFTA and the Celtic Film Festival best fiction award. Lin's website is: http://www.lin-anderson.com/
This following essay is the first of a three part blog.
Part 1: The Structure of Story
How important is it to understand the structure of a story?
When I wrote my first short story and my first novel I had no idea how stories 'worked'. I knew instinctively when one didn't work, but had no idea what was wrong with it. When I wrote my first crime piece for television, I studied how it was done by watching Prime Suspect, a classic, and noting the structure, arrangement and …

LIN ANDERSON TALKS WRITING

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I’m so excited! In a few days, Lin Anderson, the Scottish crime novelist, who has published eight novels featuring forensic expert Dr. Rhona MacLeod, will be my guest blogger. Lin’s books have been translated into several languages and are now in development for TV.
Lin will be favoring us with a three-part blog series on writing. The first installment is titled, The Structure of Story. She prefaces this essay by saying, “Here are things I wish someone had told me.”
You won’t want to miss this! This series is jam-packed with writing tips that both the newbie and the seasoned writer will find useful.
So, stay tuned. Lin’s blog will be coming up in a few days. I can assure you; you won’t be disappointed.

MONDAYS ARE MURDER: AN INTERVIEW

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Every Monday, Hawaiian mystery writer Laurie Hanan interviews an author of a murder mystery or thriller. I’m excited to be part of this week’s interview. So put on your grass skirt or your luau shirt and let’s go to Hawaii. It’s only a click away: http://westoftheequator.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/146/